Rwanda: The 1993 Rwandan genocide left a scar on the nation with excavations regularly taking place to retrieve those who were lost. They continue to this day, and thousands will never know the fate of friends and relatives.

This long-term personal project investigates post-conflict societal issues and inherited socio- psychological problems. These photographs show the process of excavating Tutsi remains by a community effort from the Rwandan genocide nearly 25 years on. Only a corrugated metal fence separates the excavation site and locals.

Excavators are largely made up of volunteers and people of Hutu and Tutsi ancestry. The terms Hutu and Tutsi were introduced by colonial powers to divide Rwanda. These terms are now illegal to use.


A volunteer worker emerges from an excavation site, wherin 2018, thousands were discovered in four mass graves.

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Workers remove soil using a pulley system.

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Any clothing discovered will usually contain identification in the form of ID cards, wallets and photographs. DNA tests are also performed.

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Remains are transferred to a nearby facility for cleaning, testing and preparation for a formal burial.

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Bags filled with hair of victims retrieved from excavation sites.

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A volunteer prepares tarps for excavators to store any remains that are uncovered.

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